Saturday, May 27, 2017

Guru Hargobind Sahib Ji


We treasure a beautiful story of a Sikh of Agra who was a humble grass-cutter. The tents of the two kings being pitched side by side in the fields, the poor Sikh approached Jehangir's tent wifh an offering of two copper pice out of his wages, and desired to know where was "the True King" "Whom do you wish to see ?" said Jehangir. "I want to see the True King," said the grass-cutter. "I am the king," said Jehangir. The grass-cutter placed his offerings before him, bowed down to him, and rose and said, "0 True King! save me, thy slave, from this sea of darkness, and take me into thy refuge of light that is All Knowledge." On this the Emperor told him that he was not the king sought, and that the saviour's tent was pitched yonder. The grass-cutter hastily took back his offerings, and went running to the Guru.

The queen, NurJehan, took a deep interest in the Guru, and had many interviews with him. Also, with the poor frequenting the place, he was in much repute as a comforter.

During these days, Jehangir fell ill; and, following the barbarous advice of his Hindu ministers, he invited his astrologers to tell him of his evil stars that brought illness on him. These astrologers were heavily bribed by Chandu, who was always seeking to detach the Emperor from Guru Har Gobind. The astrologers accordingly, prophesied that a holy man of God should go to the Fort of Gwalior and pray for his recovery from there. Chandu then advised the Emperor that Har Gobind was the holiest of men and should be sent to Gwalior. Jehangir requested Guru Har Gobind to go; and though he saw through the plot of his enemies, he left for Gwalior immediately.

While Guru Har Gobind was at Gwalior, great was the distress of his Sikhs in Delhi and at Amritsar, who suspected foul play at the part of Chandu. In fact, Chandu did write to Hari Das, the Commander of Gwalior fort, urging him to poison the Guru or kill him in any way-and promising a large reward. Hari Das was by that time devoted to the Master; so he laid all these letters before him, who smiled and said nothing. The Guru met many other Rajahs who were prisoners in this fort, and made them happy. •

When Jehangir recovered, he thought of Guru Har Gobind again. Undoubtedly, Nur Jehan, who evinced a disciple-like devotion to the Master, had something to do with his recall from Gwalior. However, the Guru would not go unless the Emperor agreed to set all the prisoners in the fort at liberty. The Emperor at last gave way; and, on the personal security of the Guru, all the prisoners were released. The Guru was hailed at Gwalior as "Bandi Chhor" - the great deliverer who cuts fetters off the prisoners feet and sets them free. There remains, in the historic fort at Gwalior, a shrine of the Bandi Chhor Pir, worshipped by Hindus and Mussalmans alike, where they have lit a lamp in memory of the event, and where a Mohammedan Faqir sits in hallowed memory of some great one of whom he knows only the name-Bandi Chhor.